Sunday Stories: Episode 10


♪♪ ♪♪ Welcome to Sunday Stories,
I’m Michael Sanford. Over the next hour we’ll be
sharing stories that celebrate the rich history, amazing
people, and fascinating places throughout our region and
beyond. What do Sandra Bullock,
Ben Affleck, Jodie Foster, Sandra Oh, Gwyneth Paltrow,
Leonardo DiCaprio, Shakira, and Natalie Portman share in common? Well, they all know how to speak
multiple languages – Natalie Portman speaks 6 languages. While the ability to speak
multiple languages is probably not the only reason for their
success, recent studies have shown significant cognitive
benefits from early language learning, and long-term
educational and career benefits for multilingual students. A school in Redding is investing
in those potential benefits through a dual language
immersion program where students are taught in both English and
Mandarin Chinese. (speaking Mandarin Chinese: “I
like it, yes, I like it”) Sarah: Welcome to Redding School
of the Arts, where about 260 kids are absorbing a second
language starting in kindergarten. Launched in 2007, this elective
program teaches 50% of the daily curriculum in English and 50% in
Mandarin. Margaret: I think that’s very
special, especially, north, this far northern California to, to
offer that as an opportunity. Student: Yeah! Margaret: They learn both the
academic and the cultural language. If they are looking to go into
the business world in the future, or the science world in
the future having that background of basic science and
math will help them later on when they’re building their own
language. Margarat: If you start young
then it’s kind of just a piece of you and you grow up with it. Michael: Preparing students for
a multi-lingual future, later on Sunday Stories. Gianna was diagnosed
with an inherited brain blood vessel disorder, and at only
11-years old she’s had multiple brain surgeries. Last season, Sacramento Republic
FC players wore specially designed cleats, and then
donated those cleats to raise funds for charity. After hearing about Gianna,
midfielder Ray Saari met with her and they designed a pair
that tells her story. Dr. Zwienenberg: Gianna and her
father have an inherited condition, familial cerebral
cavernoma. That means that these very
clusters of thin-walled blood vessels inside her brain. Kevin: I was diagnosed first. So, dealing with seizures and
everything I had, you know it wasn’t fun but it was much
harder when I learned that my daughter had, had the same thing
I did and that I passed it along to her. Since I share the same thing we
just kind of work together. I’m glad that I’ve had the
experience that I had so I can help her through her
experiences. Gianna: We talk about some of
the connections we have about our surgeries. It’s helpful so you feel
confident if you have to do it again. Kevin: I just know at age 11
that she’s gone through 2 brain surgeries there’s nothing else
that she can’t do. Tara: Yeah, she’s so strong. ♪♪ Ray: We’re here to visit
Gianna and her family, and design a cool boot. We get to collab with her and
hopefully come up with some cool stuff to honor, you know the
struggle that her and her family have been through and to show uh
that the Sac Republic family is there for them. Michael: Gianna and her special
cleats, later on Sunday Stories. If you’re passing by
his store, you just might see him sitting out in front. Ed Castro is a self-described
people person, and collector of nice things from the 1940’s,
50’s and 60’s. In today’s profile we’ll visit
with Ed at his men’s vintage clothing store, Ed’s Threads. Ed: Uh, I like people. I like being productive. I, I couldn’t possibly stay
home. There’s no way in the world I
could stay home every day. I, I just like the interchange
with the, with the life. I like nice things, things that
are well done. Basically I try to stay with
40’s, 50’s, 60’s. Lot of clothing, it’s basically
a men’s vintage clothing store. Michael: We’ll spend some time
with Ed in his shop, ahead on Sunday Stories. There’s an interactive,
hands-on design laboratory in Sonoma County where students go
to learn, do and create sometimes practical, sometimes
whimsical things. We’ll take you there to see what
they’re making. Teacher: What I’d love for you
to do. Michael: These six-graders from
Willowside Middle School in Santa Rosa may be on the most
productive field trip of their fledgling academic careers. Some are learning the basics of
coding, others are creating online designs that laser
cutters and 3D printers will turn into real products. Gitano: I like the interactive
part about it because I don’t just, I don’t like just sitting
at the desk and just doing my work. I like hands-on activities and
um always doing something. Jade: Oh, it’s so different and
it’s cool to do the hands-on experience. We watch videos in class and we
do some hands-on but like it’s nothing like this. Michael: Making makes learning
fun, later on Sunday Stories. Learning from a martial
arts master. Curious to learn and inspired to
teach. A community comes together
through art. Canine Companions for
Independence training. A place of refuge for victims of
abuse and violence. Estimates put the
number of spoken languages in the world at over 6000. Imagine the benefits of being
able to learn and speak multiple languages. What languages would you want to
learn? The people in the community of
Redding decided they wanted to give their kids the opportunity
to learn both in English and Mandarin Chinese (Singing in
Mandarin) Mike: “Oh, it’s
absolutely fabulous. It keeps me young! “A tremendous amount of
energy goes into every day, and so consequently I
go home quite exhausted (laughs)! ” Sarah: Mike Dressel’s been
studying Mandarin Chinese for more than 35 years. At one point his career
vision was to teach at the university level. But today, Dressel says
he experiences a special satisfaction,
even amazement teaching Chinese to
these six year olds. (Speaking Mandarin) Mike: “It is a very
different language, but at their age they’re
able to absorb so much. The brain is ready
to learn a language, two languages,
three languages, and we see quite a
significant amount of growth within them in the ten
months that we have them.” (food/plant samples ) Sarah: Welcome to Redding
School of the Arts, where about
260 kids are “absorbing” a second language
starting in kindergarten. Launched in 2007, this
elective program teaches 50-percent of the daily
curriculum in English and 50-percent in Mandarin. Margaret: “I think
that’s very special, especially in this far
Northern California, to offer that as
an opportunity. ” Sarah: Margaret Johnson,
director of this charter school, says it was the
Redding community that selected Mandarin over more
traditional second languages like Spanish or French. In part because of the
growing Asian population in this region and the fact
that America needs more Chinese language speakers to
do business in the world’s fastest growing
consumer market. Margaret: “They learn
both the academic and the cultural language. We believe by doing that
their language is broader, it’s not just conversational
Chinese that way. If they are looking to go
into the business world in the future or the
science world in the future, having that background of
basic science and math will help them later on when
they’re building their own language.” (Kids Singing) Sarah: And that’s
what makes this program different from traditional
language classes. From kindergarten
through fifth grade, students are “immersed” in
Chinese culture from arts and crafts to
traditions and poetry. (Speaking Mandarin) Teacher Kathy Song says by
the time students are in her fifth grade class,
they’re already thinking, listening, and reasoning
in their new language. Kathy: “For our program, we
believe that language is a tool, that’s not
supposed to be a target, it’s a tool that you learn
knowledge.” Ruby: We do speak Chinese
at my house either on my homework
or we’re writing out the characters and solving
Chinese problems it’s, umm, it’s pretty cool.” Margaret: If you start young,
then it’s just kind of a piece of you and you just kind
of grow up with it. Sarah: Parents of students
at the Redding School of the Arts are asked to
keep their kids in the immersion program through
fifth grade. Students can continue
studying Mandarin through eighth grade as an
elective course of study. Some are already dreaming
of visiting the world’s most populous nation. Ayana: “I might use it to go
to China someday maybe it’s a really big
part of the world, it has a lot of people, so
that would be helpful to speak to them because
probably a lot of them couldn’t speak English.” Margaret: “When I grow up
I want to do something in the medical field, and anything medical is
pretty bilingual and so it will be nice in the
business field or the medical field to be able to
speak another language, especially something so big
like Mandarin.” Margaret: “They’re tired at the
end of the day from using two languages, but they seem
to have a really good time. I think that children see
some real value in it and I think they have a lot of
fun and feel special that they’re in the program.” (Singing in Mandarin) Sarah: Across California,
there are more than four hundred so-called
“bi-literacy” programs, where students are
taught to speak, read, and write in two languages. Each is required to
follow California curriculum frameworks and meet or
exceed state and local content standards. Studies show that dual
immersion students often develop better
thinking, problem-solving, and even English language
skills when compared to others outside
such programs. Teachers here say
they see it first-hand. Mike: “It exposes them to
another language and another culture and
another way of thinking, brings in culture, marvelous
elements of culture that they experience
in this setting. And, it also helps to
expand their brain. We hear this from research
that it helps them to develop cognitive levels
that otherwise they may not achieve.” Ruby: “It makes it so you
can like go on to other languages too, but not
just a second language.” Margaret: “Just the brain
power that comes from knowing two languages and
the ability to think and reason in more than one
language gives you a lot of problem solving skills and
more than one way to express an opinion that
you wouldn’t otherwise get if you weren’t bilingual. And so I’m glad, especially
California that’s got so many different languages
in the school system. This is really a great
opportunity.” ♪♪ ♪♪ Michael: Later… UC Davis
Professor Lee Martin’s curiosity inspired Mobile Maker
Lab for kids. Master Amitis Pourarian a 7th
degree black belt, the highest ranked woman in the United
World Taekwondo Association, and former member of the U .S.
Taekwondo Team is the owner and lead instructor at The
Studio Martial Arts & Fitness. She believes that by helping
create an environment that allows individuals to
develop strong bodies and clear minds society will
benefit. AMITIS: You guys ready? On your feet! ♪♪ JASON: Amitis Pourarian has
a saying. AMITIS: Sweat plus
sacrifice equals success. JASON: It’s one of those
sayings that looks nice on a motivational poster. But motivation at “The
Studio Martial Arts and Fitness” doesn’t come
from posters on the wall. For the 600 students here it doesn’t even come from
the instructors. What Amitis Pourarian wants
them to know: motivation comes
from within. Amitis Pourarian: It, it’s a
drive and a, perseverance to overcome and keep working
through stuff, just cuz you hit an obstacle or
you’re challenged with something doesn’t mean
you get to stop. JASON: Amitis
and her martial arts and fitness instructors are here
to help find that motivation. Amitis Pourarian:
Unfortunately a lot of people don’t see the opportunities
that are smack dab in front of their face.
That’s the kind of, mentality that I’m looking to
improve just through the members that I have
here and, and make sure that they’re aware of the
privileges, the blessings, and the opportunities that
are in front of them now. JASON: She would know. Known here as Master P,
Amitis is now a six-degree black belt
and former member of the U.S. Tae Kwon Do team. ♪♪ She’s got the skills Amitis Pourarian: I
never played any team sports until I
started martial arts, I didn’t have the
confidence to do that and I’ve been doing martial arts
since I think it was maybe young teens and it gave me the confidence to
not only play sports, be successful in
high school, in college, JASON: Amitis credits not
only Tae Kwon Do with giving her confidence, but
also her family. A lesson in perseverance
learned when the 1979 Iranian Revolution forced
them to leave their home. Amitis Pourarian: Basically
the revolution in Iran, and then the lack of
opportunity for women at that point in time, with the direction that the
country was going in, so, I think my parents
decided hey I have, two girls right now, my mom was pregnant,
a third one on the way, and they, they decided
you know that they have to provide
a life for their daughters where they can do and be
anything they wanted. You see the sacrifices
that your parents make and you know that any
opportunity that comes your way is something
that you have to in appreciation of what they
did take advantage of and try to make the
best of it…. Otherwise to me it’s almost like
insulting your parents. ♪♪ SWeveral years ago, I hit
the pinnacle in my career in, in um, construction,
and I sat back and I said what do
I love doing? And it was teaching and
changing people’s lives, so I stepped away from that
and said you know build it and they will come,
and did this instead, again I did it all by choice
and it was, you know, kind of meant to be. JASON: Amitis opened The
Studio in 2010. Jade Pascual: At first when
I met her I was very intimidated because she is
this perfect person, you know, with a perfect body
and tough lady. Someone I look up to. But then once I get to know
her, she’s really a compassionate person,
and very smart. And very knowledgable. And I’m really amazed what she’s
able to to build and just you know,
where she’s at now. This is a way to
challenge myself to get out of my comfort zone,
because after two kids you can sink your whole
entire time into kids, everything will be about
kids and I thought hey, let’s just do
something for me. ♪♪ JASON: Amitis prides
herself on smaller classes and a decidedly non-big-box
business approach to fitness. Her customers are
willing to pay more for that personal touch. She admits, like all small
business owners, she has faced setbacks. Amitis: we launch programs
all the time and that we feel are
great ideas but they don’t have any traction
so we abandon ship and we regroup and come
up with another program, or an idea, or a process, and
we’re constantly shifting It’s the reason
why we do this, it’s when
you come in, you hear the
success stories, whether it’s their, again,
physical improvement, their mental state,
anything that they accomplish and they attribute it
to some level of your contribution to it,
it’s everything, it really is. ♪♪ Martin: I’ve always been really
curious to know how people think, how
the mind works, how we figure things out… Narr: Lee Martin’s always
been curious about how people learn – and
invent — new things. It’s a curiosity born of
spending countless weekends in his grandfather’s
basement workshop… making stuff. Martin: It was just
this space of possibility. You’d go in there and you’d
think you could kind of do anything. Narr: Every week, this
professor from the UC Davis School of Education sets out to provide a
“space of possibility” for other young people. Loading this specially
outfitted van with tools and materials to make…stuff. Lee calls it…the BETA Lab. (Van door closes) (van pulls away) Narr: At some destinations, like
a Boys or Girls Club… young people may use
the van itself as a workshop and mobile laboratory. Today, at Sacramento’s
Met High School, Lee and these ninth through
twelfth graders are bringing power tools, a 3-D printer,
even a laser cutter into teacher Christopher
Chu’s chemistry class. They’re all members of the
“Makers Club” — a growing movement that encourages
kids to design and build projects for both
playful and useful ends. Martin: One of the things I
love about the maker stuff is that it’s a place
where learning new ideas, it’s really clear how it’s
going to enable you to do new things. Emily: It’s really just
anyone who enjoys inventing and kind of tinkering and
just working with their hands to create something. Narr: Raul, a senior,
is perfecting his remote control car design. Raul: So this year the
goal was just to make it, make it better, and
it’s a lot better. Chu: One of the things I
think that makes them really special, especially
this group, is they like to take risks.
They like to try new things and they’re not afraid to make
mistakes. Ava: There’s just
this feeling of success when you do something
on your own. You make something and then
you can look back at it in the future and
say, ‘I did that. Martin: It’s about this session
and then next week . . . Narr: In graduate school,
Lee became fascinated with how people cultivate
“adaptive expertise” – the ability to learn new
things and work through unexpected challenges. As an avid “maker” himself,
he wondered if building and transporting a “workshop
on wheels” to underserved communities would help spark
curiosity and creativity in young people… enhancing traditional
types of “STEM” education Martin: There are a lot of
signals to young women and young people of color
that say engineering, design are not spaces that are
necessarily for you and that’s deeply problematic. So by creating a space where
they feel that they do fit in. By creating a space where
they can be successful and with something really
tangible that they can walk out and say “I made
this’ that at least has the potential to really show
them that there are spaces that they fit in, belong,
and that their ideas are valued. Narr: Met High School
principal Denise Lambert says the BETA Lab also lets
her students experience a collegiate-type classroom
environment with a real UC Davis professor. Lambert: The resources that
are provided through the program are awesome…. I don’t think these students
would have that opportunity, so it opens
another door for them. Pedro: Lee is an
amazing person. I don’t see him
more as a professor, I see him more as a friend
because he’s just helping, not just me, but the
other students step by step. Emily: It’s amazing.
He’s a wonderful resource. He’s a kind person and he’s
really there to help teach you and walk you through. Chu: Not only does he bring
like a lot of resources and supplies, he brings
resources in terms of people. Like, it’s relationships,
it’s mentorship, it’s knowledge that he’s
able to give to the kids. Narr: Lee admits it’s still
too early to measure the success of the BETA
Lab in a quantifiable, data-driven way. Results so far are only
anecdotal – and individual. But he and others
are encouraged. Martin: There are all these
great ideas out there… that, I think, can be so
joyful and exciting for thinking about having these
tools to make sense of the world, to make it more
meaningful and then to create, to move the world
towards what you want it to be. ♪♪ ♪♪ Michael: Later… the connection
made between a soccer player and an 11-year old girl. Our next story has us joining
the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department on a
special mission bringing the community together
for a mural project and using public art to build
stronger connections ♪♪ ♪♪ Elisha Johnson: Well, this
project came about through the vision of Captain
Barnes, he had the idea of making public art. Laurie Costello: Captain
Barnes really wanted to find a way to connect with
the community, to bring them in to our station and
to meet with them and to let them meet us and to
try to bond and find those relationships. “What can we do to connect
with the community?” Jim Barnes: This was
something I truly believed in and we pushed forward. Without the help of Deputy
Elisha Johnson, our crime prevention specialist
Laurie Costello, this wouldn’t have happened. Elisha: I reached out to
some community members, the Head Start program,
Dream Big program. I sought out to find a
local artist who was willing to volunteer and
help with the project. “We are working with a local
artist Shonna McDaniels” I came across Shonna
McDaniels who runs the Sojourner Truth Museum. Shonna McDaniels: I received
an email from Mr. Elisha with the sheriffs dept.,
asking me if I would assist him with creating a mural
project. I had a chance to talk
to each of the youth and I ask them if you were to
draw something on a community mural, what would that
look like for you? All these wonderful ideas
the kids shared that day. Jim: Shonna McDaniels took
those ideas, put them all together with the concepts
that I had expressed to her as well with the
community and put the design together. “Parents and volunteers,
can you make sure the little kids are doing
the very bottom?” Jim: The day it happened,
it was a very special day. A lot of nervous anxiety
energy, you know, you don’t know how it’s
going to be received. Elisha: That day was
definitely a busy day but it was definitely a joy
to see so many different groups come together,
I think you can’t really have an event
without food. I’m always disappointed
when there’s events and you don’t offer
food to people. We did it paint by
numbers so even I couldn’t mess that up. Jim: So when I saw the
silhouettes of the young kids playing and the
bubbles and everything and it was neat and just
making sure that people are represented. Elisha: For the law
enforcement officers, it’s definitely a difficult
battle on keeping the perspective on the
community as a whole versus what we deal with
on the day to day because as an officer, we actually
deal with less than 3% of the population. It’s not just about the
work of art itself, it’s about bringing the people
together so that they can better understand law
enforcement and law enforcement could better
understand the community Laurie Costello: I think
on both sides the guard is up when you’re in
your day to day job. Shonna McDaniels: the
Sheriff’s Department being able to have a connection
with the community and I think it’s very crucial
for that relationship to be strong. Jim: Projects like
this should be done. I think it’s important,
the more we can interact with our community in a
non-enforcement capacity. For me it does change
things and not everybody’s going to buy in. However that doesn’t mean
we stop trying and this was an opportunity to
find a different way. We have a long road to
go, but I know it’s our sheriff’s mission that we
are going to connect with our community and continue
to do that community outreach. Our job is to represent
the community that we serve. We have officers sometimes
that say, “I earned my badge,” and I say no, the
community entrusts that badge upon you and
you earn it the day you retire. Elisha: I think projects
like this can be duplicated across
the nation. There’s artists in every
city, every town and there’s law enforcement in
every city, every town, so I think that definitely
they can come together, create a work of art and
get the community involved because it’s not just
about the artwork but it’s about getting the
community involved and helping to continue a
foundation of a positive relationship between law
enforcement and community members. Shonna: Art is a part of
our lives and to be able to work together
collectively in unity and harmony, art will
change the world. We just need more
opportunities to be able to make it happen. ♪♪ ♪♪ Marike Zwienenberg: Gianna and
her father have an inherited condition, familial
cerebral cavernoma. That means that these clusters
of thin walled blood vessels inside her brain. If you have it, you have a 50%
chance that your child will have it as well. Kevin Arredondo: I was diagnosed
first, so dealing with seizures and everything I had, you know,
it wasn’t fun but it was much harder when I learned that my
daughter had the same thing I did and that I passed
it along to her. Since I share the same thing,
we just kind of work together. I’m glad that I’ve had the
experience that I had so I can help her through her
experiences. Marike: From the interactions
that I’ve observed between the family, they’re in it as a
team and that’s a really wonderful approach. Gianna Arredondo: We talk about
some of the connections we have about our surgeries. It’s helpful so you feel
confident if you have to do it again. Tara Arredondo: Right now she is
doing really well. She does have another cavernoma
in her brain but we are leaving it alone and hopefully forever. Kevin A.: I just know at age 11
she’s gone through two brain surgeries. There’s nothing else that she
can’t do. Tara: Yeah, she’s so strong. ♪♪ Ray Saari: We’re here to
visit Gianna and her family and design a cool boot. We get to collab with her and
hopefully come up with some cool stuff to honor the struggle
that her and her family have been through and show that
the Sac Republic family is there for them. Ray: How are you guys?
Tara: Hi. Man: Come on in.
Ray: Hi. Tara: Where are we going? Man: Yeah, we’re going to go
there.
Tara: Oh, over here. Okay. Ray: Hi, I’m Ray.
It’s nice to meet you. Ray: I have people that did it
for me, like when I was going through everything I went
through and getting to meet Lance Armstrong and getting to
do things with the sport in KC and stuff like that, it was
an inspiration for me. Ray: Do you have some
ideas for your boots? What you’d like them to be like? Kevin Lee: A while back I
proposed a project to UC Davis and Sac Republic to try and
raise some awareness down at the children’s hospital. Recently it’s just been a little
bit more exposure on the ability to express yourself with
your cleats. I think that aspect of it is
really cool, where somebody else can tell their story
without really expressing it
verbally. Ray: What did you say your
ribbon color was again? Gianna: Red. Ray: Red. My type of cancer, it was like a
light purple ribbon, so we could do two different ribbons coming
together or something like that, which would be cool. Gianna: For the top of the shoe,
we’re going to have both of our names underneath where the lace
is going to be and we’re going to have the color of the ribbon
that we have as the lace. Ray: I’m lucky that I get to be
here and to get to showcase their message on a bigger stage
is something I think that can be very special for them. Kevin L.: I think everybody has
a story to tell. The fact that the whole family’s
going through it, the bond that a family has to have while
they’re going through this, it’s great. Luckily for us, Ray was nice
enough to involve himself in this project, use his platform
and his publicity along with UC Davis Health and Sac Republic
to raise that awareness. So I’m just glad I can be a part
of it. We got you your own jersey.
That’s kind of cool. Tara: How cool. Kevin B.: So you can match the
squad’s now. Tara: That’s so cool. Kevin A.: Yeah, I think that’s
amazing. Tara: Yeah, I do too. Kevin A.: That the soccer team’s
doing that, the artists are getting involved and then to
raise awareness for our condition and then donate the
cleats to raise money for the children’s hospital. It’s amazing. I just think it’s great that
he’s not just a soccer player, he’s going above and beyond. Tara: Yeah. Kevin A.: And he’s getting
involved with patients and he’s going to be part of this charity
to raise money and awareness, so I just think
that’s fantastic. Tara: Hi. Ray: Hey, how’s it going? Tara: Good.
How are you? Ray: I’ll tell you in about a
couple seconds. Kevin A.: Good to see you. Ray: Good to see you. Tara: Hi, good to see you too. Ray: How are you? Tara: Can you say hi? Ray: You all right?
I’m giving you a hug. Tara: Oh, I’m so excited to see. Kevin A.: Oh, you’re wearing
them. Ray: Yeah, I know. Tara: Awesome. Ray: They put a lot of your
stuff over here on this one. Tara: Oh, look! Cool. Ray: That’s your 11, the eboy. Your name is right there. Tara: Oh my gosh, that’s so
cool. Awesome. Kevin A.: That’s awesome.
Tara: Yes. Kevin A.: Thank you for doing
that. Tara: Yeah. Ray: Of course. ♪♪ Kevin L.: Thanks for
coming up with all the designs. Ray: Yeah, it was all you. Kevin L.: Makes my job easier. Kevin A.: Handshake? Kevin L.: Handshake. Announcer: And here’s the
starting lineup for the Sacramento Republic FC! ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ Michael: Still ahead, we visit
Ed’s Threads and meet owner Ed Castro. This next story has lots of cute
dogs, but don’t let their cuteness fool you – they’re hard
at work training. Learning to become assistance
dogs for people living with disabilities. We’ll find out what the
differences are between a therapy dog and a service dog,
and what it takes to train a Canine Companions
for Independence service dog. Narrator: It’s common for people
to confuse therapy dogs with service dogs but
there’s a distinct difference
between the two. Margaret Peterson is an
instructor with Canine Companions for
Independence, the world’s largest organization
raising and training assistance dogs for
people with disabilities Margaret: A therapy dog is a
dog who is typically a pet dog and they are trained
and often they are certified through
some organization. And they may be invited to
a specific location such as a hospital or school
to provide some sort of therapy there. They don’t have public
access so you can’t just take your therapy dog to
the grocery store because the dog does not have a
task or a job to do there. Their job is
working with people where they are invited. A service dog is a dog that
is trained to do a task. So they are helping somebody
who has a disability. They have access to take
their dog with them because that dog is
assisting them to live an independent life. Narrator: Today Margaret and her
team are training these pups the essential
commands needed to one day become a service dog. Trainer: Get up! That’s a girl!
Good job! Margaret: So definitely, the
goal is to help people become more
independent. We have had people who
have had to rely on people all their lives and they
get a dog and all of a sudden, they’re
not alone anymore. They don’t have to
ask their neighbor or their friend to
come in to help with picking
something up. Narrator: Picking up an item
is just one of the many commands these
dogs can do. Margaret: They can pull somebody
in a manual wheelchair, they can tug open
a door or a drawer and some people use
that command to tug a laundry basket or some
sort of container. Pushing things
with their nose whether it’s pushing
a door close or a drawer. Turning off and
on the lights. Margaret: Good! Narrator: One of the hardest
things and most important is keeping the dogs
focused at all times Margaret: Training distraction
is a big part of it. The graduate dogs when
they go out in public they have to focus on what
their commands and tasks are. They can’t be looking at
somebody else walking down the street. If the person
drops something right then, they need that focus. Narrator: Not all the dogs
end up making the cut.>>About 50% of the dogs
make it through and graduate, there are some
release dogs that don’t make it and they might
be released for a medical reason or a behavioral
reason, and some dogs choose that’s not for them
and they’d rather be a pet. Narrator: But for the dogs that
successfully complete the intensive training program
it’s on to the next step in their journey, being
matched with a person who will rely on them
day in and day out. Ed: I am a collector. There’s a lot of
eye candy here. I like nice things. Things that are well done. Basically I try
to stay with 40s, 50s, 60s. A lot of clothing.
it’s basically a men’s vintage
clothing store. To be here 40 years,
I would never have thought it in
the beginning. I have seen a lot of
different businesses on this street alone,
come and go. And uh they can’t
get rid of me, apparently
(laughs) What keeps me here
of course is the challenge of it. I enjoy a challenge,
but then again It is a labor of love. My passion for clothing has
always been something that I’ve had in me. Ed: Now this
shirt here is from the 40s and probably one of the
oldest shirts I have here. This is a very
unique shirt That’s not the only
one of course, I’m sure there are others here
that fall into that category. You can’t go into any thrift
shop and find the amount of vintage, real vintage
clothing not used clothing,
that I possess. You can’t. You’ll may find one piece two
pieces maybe if you’re lucky. Once again’ here’s one
from the 50s that I think is extremely unique. Ed: The material itself. The patterns, the colors. Then the workmanship. The panache of a 50s
shirt as opposed to today’s shirt. World of difference. It’s just hard to describe,
but it’s very noticeable to someone that is
into vintage clothing. They can spot
in a heartbeat. Customer: You know what
I’m looking for? Some of those flashy
Scarface kind of shirts? You know know, shiny. Ed: One of the things that I really have enjoyed
about being here is, through the years. I’ve made a lot of friends. And you can’t have
too many friends. Customer: It’s
good seeing you Ed. Always good seeing you. Ed: Alright. Likewise. And I think that’s probably
the bottom line on this. In fact, what would
you do without friends? Lyle: Hey Ed. Ed: Hey Lyle! Nice
seeing you man! Ed: I am a people person. I think that helps
immensely in anything I endeavor to do. I’ve just got a shirt
that you got to see it man. Lyle: Oh let’s look at it. Ed: It’s you! Lyle: I’ve been coming
to the shop since 1987. Ed: Isn’t that gorgeous? Lyle: Very nice! We both love
the the era from which this clothing is from. Ed: I know you like black. Lyle: Yup. Ed: You’ve been
known to wear it before. Lyle: And it looks
like the right size. Ed: And it’s most
definitely the right size. Lyle: Yeah. Lyle: We’ve developed a
friendship over the years and we even hang
outside the store. Ed: Did you know Lyle that the
cover of Sargent Pepper. . . Lyle: When it comes to
clothing and music, Ed knows both very well. He’s been around a little
longer than I but I learn from his wisdom and I love
Ed being here in the store. He’s a fixture. Ed: When I first started it
wasn’t a clothing store
per se. long story very short, uh, opened up a
record shop in this space. Did that for quite
a few years. And enjoyed some success. And Sinatra died, to be
perfectly honest with you. And I didn’t want to
participate in the music scene anymore. And so, I decided to switch
over to vintage clothing. But music has always
been a part of my life. I like everything
about the records. I like the physical aspects
of putting a record on a turntable. I like
the mechanics of it. ♪♪ The sound is, is more pure. It’s a warmer sound. And I also believe
it’s a time capsule. It’s worthy of collecting. I was raised on this! I was weened on it. Ed: Young Again!
(laughs) Yeah, young again. Whoo! My age is
at this moment, is 87 years old. I don’t feel 87
but uh you know, as far as um getting tired
of doing what I’m currently doing, uh I still
enjoy it a lot. Here again, I like people. I like being productive. I couldn’t possibly
stay at home. There’s no way in the world
I could stay home every day. I just like the
interchange with life. ♪♪ ♪♪ Michael: Later… a look at the
Maker Movement and a program where kids are excited to learn
by doing. Escaping violence and
an abusive environment is extremely difficult. Our next story takes us to the
Sacramento Regional Family Justice Center, where
80 agencies work together to provide a safe place where
victims of domestic violence, child abuse, human trafficking,
and elder abuse can go to get
help. ♪♪ Jan Scully: When people
hear about it, they go, Why haven’t we been doing that
for a really long time? Why did we leave victims to
do everything themselves when, if they leave a
violent environment, they leave with nothing and
we expect them to do everything? How? Rob: This is the story of
four powerful people. Jan Scully, Faith Whitmore,
Tamra McIntosh, and her daughter Luv McIntosh. Each woman has an important
story of her own. But what they are doing
together – is extraordinary – every one of these women
could tell it herself, except Luv. Her murder is what brought
these women together here at the Sacramento Regional
Family Justice Center. Rob: Tell me about Luv. Tamra McIntosh: Well Luv was
a loyal friend to many, she was a prankster,
loving, caring. Rob: Luv McIntosh is a victim of
domestic violence, killed by her boyfriend in 2012. Rob: What do you
want to say for Luv on Luv’s behalf? Tamra: I want to say for
these women and men who are in relationships – if you
feel it’s not going to work out, I think you should
find an exit plan. Rob: This room is named
in memory of Luv. It’s one of many safe
spaces at the Family Justice
center – or FJC. A one stop shop of
collaboration and care for victims of domestic
violence, elder abuse, sexual assault, human
trafficking and child abuse. If that’s you, this place
could save your life. All you have to do
is call or show up. Jan Scully is the driving
force behind the creation of Sacramento’s FJC. Scully spent almost 40 years
prosecuting crimes, 20 of those years – as
Sacramento’s elected district attorney. Scully announced at her
retirement in 2014 the launch of the FJC. Her mission became reality
in 2016 when these doors to safety and hope opened wide. Jan Scully: When I was a
DA some considered me a hardnosed prosecutor, you
know, lock ’em up, and that was true on the right
crimes, but it wasn’t true with every crime. And in the area of family
violence, you can’t prosecute your way
out of the problem. It’s so much bigger. And so, for me, yes, was
I ready to leave the DA’s office as the elected DA? Yes, but I wasn’t ready to
fold up my tent and just go hide. I still felt I could make a
contribution and I wanted to be part of something in the
community side of it that was bigger, not one faceted
but multi-faceted and that’s what the Family
Justice Center is. Rob: A staggering 80 agencies
work together at the FJC. The result? Quick response time, even
case workers can rush to emergency rooms to a
victim’s side, filing restraining orders remotely,
intervening during the critical moments a victim is
being treated and protected. Rob: What do you say to
someone who is trapped in a domestic violence situation? Feels trapped,
perception is reality. Jan: Tell someone. Rob Stewart: Who? Jan: It depends
on your community. Tell someone that
you can trust. Maybe at work. Maybe that safe
place is at work. Maybe that safe place is
a relative or a neighbor. You know, what’s funny is
that a lot of people aren’t the ones who report domestic
violence on their own. It takes someone else. Domestic violence, family
violence touches all of us. And so, part of that answer
to the community is we need to start talking about it. Jan: If you’re thinking
about getting ready to leave and your abuser knows it,
that’s an issue so you need that support, you
need those services. You need the safety plan
that we give to, help design with the victim before
they walk out of the door. Rob: You have all that
here and it’s free. Jan: It’s all free. Rob: More than 5,000 victims are
safer today, all from coming through these doors. This safe space is armed
with police and protective care for victims
of all ages. There’s even Buddy the
therapy dog, ready to help. Jan: The word is hope. Our byline is,
Hope thrives here. Just get here and we’ll
take it from there. Faith Whitmore is CEO with
her heart in service. This Methodist minister says
love and grace is alive at FJC, as well as lifesaving
abuse education and tools – one of which, a danger
risk assessment test. Faith Whitmore: They look
objectively at those 20 questions and if they’ve
filled out 15 or 16, they go, Oh my gosh, I am really
in a dangerous situation that I didn’t know I was in. I didn’t know
it was this bad. Rob: You set the tone. It’s a joyful place. Isn’t that odd? Faith: It is, I know. I’m glad you felt that
because that’s what we want to create. We want to create a peaceful
place, a warm place, like come on in, we’re going
to take care of you. Rob: Which takes us back inside
to Tamra, who is here supporting the FJC, raising
her daughter’s voice to keep others from being silenced
– by domestic violence. Rob: What are you thinking. Tamra: I’m thinking about
Luv at this moment. Rob: What is the thought? Tamra: I think
she’d be proud. Rob: You going to be ok? Tamra: Yes. Rob: How do you know? Tamra: Because I have
to be here for Luv. Rob: And her living
will not be in vain. Tamra: For Sure. Rob: Thank you. Tamra: Thank you. ♪♪ Casey: What I’d love
for you to do. . . Michael: These sixth-graders
from Willowside Middle School in Santa Rosa may be
on the most productive field trip of their fledgling
academic careers. Some are learning the basics
of coding…others are creating online designs
that laser cutters and 3- D printers will turn
into real products. Gitano: I like the
interactive part about it because I don’t just, I
don’t like just sitting at the desk in just
doing my work. I like hands-on activities
and always doing something. Jade: Oh, it’s so different
and it’s cool to do the hands-on experience. We watch videos in class
and we do some hands-on but, like, it’s
nothing like this. Michael: This frenzy of
activity and creativity isn’t taking
place at a school. This so-called “design
laboratory” is actually located inside the Sonoma
County Office of Education headquarters. It’s the brainchild
of Casey Shea… Coordinator for Maker
Education for the entire county’s school district. But…what is “making”? Casey: The shortest
definition of making is taking an idea that
you have in your head, and putting it
in your hands, going through the
process to put it together, whatever that takes. Michael: The “maker
movement”…young people turning their creative
visions into tangible and often practical or whimsical
objects…is now a worldwide phenomenon, with over
240 maker fairs across the globe. But it began right in Sonoma
County with this man Dale Dougherty. The founder of Maker
Media and publisher of Make magazine wanted to promote
the do-it-yourself mindset to help students learn
STEAM concepts: science, technology, English,
art, and math. A non-traditional approach
to counter old teaching methods that often didn’t
resonate with some students. Casey: I was a high school
teacher for many years. So unfortunately, by high
school a lot of the kids, there’s a significant number
of kids who are sort of turned off to
the whole system. And we’re icing out a
whole generation of kids, a whole group of students,
who could be the next innovators and the next
problem solvers that we need. Lisa: I absolutely love
coming to the design lab. It’s one – the kids have
told me it’s one of their favorite trips of the year. Michael: These students are
learning about electricity as they create their
own LED flashlights. Their teacher, Lisa Berges,
says what she loves most about this lab and maker
education is how it inspires kids who don’t necessarily
shine in a classroom setting. Lisa: It just
allows freedom, it’s discovery, they go
with their gut and they test and they iterate,
and they persevere. Michael: Sonoma County
Schools Superintendent Steven Herrington became
such an advocate of maker education that he and
Shea started training other teachers in 2014. One year later they joined
with Sonoma State University to create the first fully
accredited program in the nation… honored that same
year by the White House. Now, teachers come here
from all over the U.S. to discover how to set
up their own make labs. Dr. Herrington: There’s a
lot of things going for the make movement, because
teachers realize that this creates an
environment for creativity, but it also creates an
environment of success for learning. Michael: The design lab’s
even proven to be a hit among those in
special education. Neal McKenzie, who teaches
visually impaired and blind students like Ricky, say
they’ve worked together to create tactile objects with
readable Braille messages — like simulated calculators,
computer keyboards and other objects. Their designs are being
shared around the world. Neal: I send my files out
and people download them all the time, and I see my
things being used in all other places, and that’s a
pretty awesome feeling to see a kid in Canada using
a thing that I designed. Ricky: It’s very gratifying
just knowing people are using designs that I
thought of sometimes. ♪♪ Michael: For Sonoma county
schools that don’t have the space or resources for
their own maker lab, the county offers a mobile
lab that comes to them. (Opens van door) Michael: Over in
Sacramento, UC Davis education professor
Lee Martin takes his mobile lab out to schools
all over the region. Like in Sonoma County, Lee
wants to provide a “space of possibility” for
students by filling this van with tools and materials
to make “stuff.” ( Unloading stuff from van) Michael: Today, at Sacramento’s
Met High School, Lee and these ninth through
twelfth graders are bringing power tools, a 3-D printer,
even a laser cutter into teacher Christopher
Chu’s chemistry class. They’re all members of
their own “Makers Club.” Lee: One of the things I
love about the maker stuff is that it’s a place
where learning new ideas, it’s really clear how it’s
going to enable you to do new things.” Emily: It’s really just
anyone who enjoys inventing and kind of tinkering and
just working with their hands to create something. Chu: One of the things I
think that makes them really special,
especially this group, is they like to take risks. They like to try new things
and they’re not afraid to make mistakes. Ava: There’s just this
feeling of success when you do something on your own. You make something and then
you can look back at it in the future and say,
‘I did that.’ Michael: As an avid “maker”
himself, Lee wondered if transporting a “workshop on
wheels” to underserved communities would help spark
curiosity and creativity in young people. Lee: There are a lot of
signals to young women and young people of color
that say engineering, design are not spaces
that are necessairly for you and that’s deeply
problematic. By creating a space where they
feel that they do fit in by creating a space where
they can be successful and with something really
tangible that they can walk out and say “I made this.’
I think that at least has the potential to really show
them that there are spaces that they fit in, belong,
and that their ideas are valued. Michael: Establishing
maker programs and training teachers
can be challenging. But most educators agree
it can provide a spark that changes both students’
and teachers’ lives. Gitano: I’d recommend
just trying it, because it’s really fun when
you get to do it and even if things don’t work out, it’s
always a good experience. Steven: Your
students will benefit, and you will love it because
it’s a whole new exploration of learning for
you as an adult. Lisa: I would
say, just go for it. It’s a little
scary at first. But if you allow them
flexibility and you trust them they
produce great results. All: Makers
♪♪ ♪♪ I’m Michael Sanford.
It’s been a pleasure being part of your Sunday. We hope you’ve enjoyed today’s
stories and that you’ll be back next time for another
episode of Sunday Stories. Until then, have
a great week. ♪♪

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