Maria Killam: How to Use My Large Painted Colour Boards


– Hi, everyone. Okay, so I was really excited when I bought these brand new botanicals that I recently installed
in my dining room because this was a great opportunity to show you how I work
with my large samples and just get a sense of
really how my system works, how it works to have only 50
samples or a hundred samples and that’s really all you need when you’re looking for the right neutral. So when I first got these botanicals and I leaned them up against the wall with no other accessories or anything, this is what it looked like. Okay, so see how when
you were just comparing the print to the wall colour, the wall started looking like they were a little
bit pink in comparison? So I thought I’d pull out
my colours in my system so you could get a sense of how it works. Okay, so I was trying to find
which one is the background and the first ones I’ve pulled out were these two from Benjamin Moore: Manchester Tan and Grant Beige. Come up and just, yeah, so you can see that if you compare Manchester
Tan and Grant Beige, they’re both looking pretty good. Feather Down is the lightest, lighter green beige greige
from Manchester Tan, but then if you look at these two, Natural Elements and Camouflage, well, Natural Elements is looking too blue and so is Camouflage,
it’s just a bit darker. So now, it’s looking
like, well, that’s not, Camouflage is a sage, right? It’s not a neutral, so these would definitely be a no, right? So I mean, this is a really good way of if you’re in your client’s
house or in your own house to see if the colour is working. Now, I can do this here. I mean, I’m always telling you to put white behind the colour, and we will be doing that here as well, but the reason why I can
kind of show you these, because, first of all, I wanted you to see what it looks like behind the original colour but also because the
colours are really pale and they’re not that different
from what’s underneath it. So now, you lay out the
colours and you narrow it down but then when you decide, okay, I’m actually
gonna really narrow down what colour I’m gonna paint this room, so I always turn around
two samples like this. So then, if Manchester Tan
was gonna be the colour that, we’re not painting the
room Manchester Tan, why? Because everybody wants
white, the white is to white. It is an ongoing problem. Is it working? – [Video Camera Operator]
It is. (both laughing) No one wants beige. – Nobody wants beige and nobody wants grey and everyone just wants
the palest of pale. So now, if I put
Manchester Tan up to this, it’s looking pretty good, right? But we’re not gonna paint the
room Manchester Tan, are we? No. So if we were going to repaint this room, now, the reason why it doesn’t bother me that the botanicals are
slightly greener than the walls and that the walls look a little pinker is because the room is styled. You can get away with so
much more if you decorate. Okay, so here’s Feather Down. Now, this is a green grey beige greige, and that is what I would paint the room. That’s what I would tweak
it to if I really did, like if I was starting from scratch and I didn’t already have almost, the almost perfect colour on the walls. So I would paint it Feather Down because I know that it’s
a green beige greige. When you get to the greiges, and I am gonna talk about this in detail on a new section of my workshop on day two called The White Workshop because we need to understand white and the minutia of greige just as much as the
minutia of beige or grey. But because white and black
is where the new trends are, that’s where we’re gonna
spend a lot of time on. Okay, so Feather Down
is what I would paint it and now, I just wanna talk about, I don’t think we talked yet
about what colour this colour or the actual existing colour of the walls were because the colour of these walls were Rice Paper by Cloverdale Paint because they sponsored
the paint in this house when I first moved in eight years ago. So what I’ve come up with
is the closest colour to their Rice Paper colour is Panda White with Sherwin-Williams. Now this is from my Foundations collection for Sherwin-Williams
because, basically, my system is highly transferable
to any paint company. You don’t need to just use Benjamin Moore or just use Sherwin-Williams. If you understand the system and you know what are on
each of the nine undertones, which the colours are,
you can match them up to whatever paint company you’re using until you get the same result so that you don’t need to sift
through millions of colours and you don’t need to go
through every single white in the collection or every
single greige or grey. So don’t you think it was kind of cool that out of all the colours
that are out there in the world, immediately, I pulled out
the green beiges in my system and they happen to match the botanicals? Yes, because that’s why the system works because the colours are always found. People that make art
and choose the colours that go into fabrics and carpets, they must be using the
colours in my system because they always work. Anyway, I hope that gives you a good sense of how this is working. I’m gonna do a lot more of these but this one I thought
was kind of interesting because of what I first noticed when I first put the botanicals up, I immediately saw that, oh,
they were slightly different but they’re also darker,
which is why it doesn’t look like they’re completely in the same value, and that is the other reason
why it doesn’t bother me. So if you look at my entire room, you can see that there
is no beige in this room. So it’s kind of, like,
this is the dining room with my green beige botanicals and I’m okay with that ’cause
all greens go together, but that’s a video for another day. Bye everyone.

1 comment

Video Transcript:
– Hi, everyone.

Okay, so I was really excited when I bought these brand new botanicals that I recently installed in my dining room because this was a great opportunity to show you how I work with my large samples and just get a sense of really how my system works, how it works to have only 50 samples or a hundred samples and that's really all you need when you're looking for the right neutral.

So when I first got these botanicals and I leaned them up against the wall with no other accessories or anything, this is what it looked like. Okay, so see how when you were just comparing the print to the wall colour, the wall started looking like they were a little bit pink in comparison? So I thought I'd pull out my colours in my system so you could get a sense of how it works.

Okay, so I was trying to find which one is the background and the first ones I've pulled out were these two from Benjamin Moore: Manchester Tan and Grant Beige. Come up and just, yeah, so you can see that if you compare Manchester Tan and Grant Beige, they're both looking pretty good. Feather Down is the lightest, lighter green beige greige from Manchester Tan, but then if you look at these two, Natural Elements and Camouflage, well, Natural Elements is looking too blue and so is Camouflage, it's just a bit darker.

So now, it's looking like, well, that's not, Camouflage is a sage, right? It's not a neutral, so these would definitely be a no, right? So I mean, this is a really good way of if you're in your client's house or in your own house to see if the colour is working. Now, I can do this here. I mean, I'm always telling you to put white behind the colour, and we will be doing that here as well, but the reason why I can kind of show you these, because, first of all, I wanted you to see what it looks like behind the original colour but also because the colours are really pale and they're not that different from what's underneath it.

So now, you lay out the colours and you narrow it down but then when you decide, okay, I'm actually gonna really narrow down what colour I'm gonna paint this room, so I always turn around two samples like this. So then, if Manchester Tan was gonna be the colour that, we're not painting the room Manchester Tan, why? Because everybody wants white, the white is to white. It is an ongoing problem. Is it working?

– [Video Camera Operator] It is. No one wants beige.

– Nobody wants beige and nobody wants grey and everyone just wants the palest of pale. So now, if I put Manchester Tan up to this, it's looking pretty good, right? But we're not gonna paint the room Manchester Tan, are we? No.

So if we were going to repaint this room, now, the reason why it doesn't bother me that the botanicals are slightly greener than the walls and that the walls look a little pinker is because the room is styled. You can get away with so much more if you decorate.

Okay, so here's Feather Down. Now, this is a green grey beige greige, and that is what I would paint the room. That's what I would tweak it to if I really did, like if I was starting from scratch and I didn't already have almost, the almost perfect colour on the walls. So I would paint it Feather Down because I know that it's a green beige greige.

When you get to the greiges, and I am gonna talk about this in detail on a new section of my workshop on day two called The White Workshop because we need to understand white and the minutia of greige just as much as the minutia of beige or grey. But because white and black is where the new trends are, that's where we're gonna spend a lot of time on.

Okay, so Feather Down is what I would paint it and now, I just wanna talk about, I don't think we talked yet about what colour this colour or the actual existing colour of the walls were because the colour of these walls were Rice Paper by Cloverdale Paint because they sponsored the paint in this house when I first moved in eight years ago.

So what I've come up with is the closest colour to their Rice Paper colour is Panda White with Sherwin-Williams. Now this is from my Foundations collection for Sherwin-Williams because, basically, my system is highly transferable to any paint company.

You don't need to just use Benjamin Moore or just use Sherwin-Williams. If you understand the system and you know what are on each of the nine undertones, which the colours are, you can match them up to whatever paint company you're using until you get the same result so that you don't need to sift through millions of colours and you don't need to go through every single white in the collection or every single greige or grey.

So don't you think it was kind of cool that out of all the colours that are out there in the world, immediately, I pulled out the green beiges in my system and they happen to match the botanicals?

Yes, because that's why the system works because the colours are always found. People that make art and choose the colours that go into fabrics and carpets, they must be using the colours in my system because they always work.

Anyway, I hope that gives you a good sense of how this is working. I'm gonna do a lot more of these but this one I thought was kind of interesting because of what I first noticed when I first put the botanicals up, I immediately saw that, oh, they were slightly different but they're also darker, which is why it doesn't look like they're completely in the same value, and that is the other reason why it doesn't bother me. So if you look at my entire room, you can see that there is no beige in this room.

So it's kind of, like, this is the dining room with my green beige botanicals and I'm okay with that 'cause all greens go together, but that's a video for another day.

Bye everyone.

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